Australian Grapes

Nutraceutical Grape Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

The Botanical Innovations Group has developed a unique proprietary range of products from Australian Grapes.

Australian Grapes
Genus: Vitis
Botanical Name: Vitis Vinifera

Our Grapes

The Botanical Innovations Group is located in Central West NSW 600 metres above sea level with temperatures in the summer 450C and winter -100C. The cold growing season over the winter months and hot dry summers have created Botanical Innovations unique poly phenolic profile in it wine and grape products.

Australian Grapes

French naturalist MF Person sent out to Australia by the Emperor Napoleon during the years 1801 to 1804. A shrewd observer he saw even at the early period of Australian history that there were unequalled possibility for wine.

“ By one of those chances which are inconceivable, Great Britain is the only one of the great maritime powders which does not cultivate the vine, either in its own territories or its colonies, notwithstanding, the consumption of wine on boards its fleets and throughout its vast regions is immense”

In 1893 Philip Muskett wrote, the future prosperity of Australia is the wine industry. Its development means a large export to trade to other countries. It means the use of Australian wine as a national and everyday wholesome beverage. It means covering of the land with vinegary employment and a more diffused distribution of the population throughout Australia.

The everyday wine for Australian use is a wine of low alcoholic strength which maybe taken with benefit which is beneficial, hygienic, restorative and wholesome.

Source: The Art of Living in Australia was written by Philip E. Muskett in 1893 with recipes by Mr Wicken. Philip E Muskett was an Australian born medical practitioner and health reformer and Mrs Wicken was lecturer in charge of ‘domestic economy’ at Sydney Technical College.

The Botanical Innovations Nutraceutical Grape and Wine Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients are rich sources of polyphenols and antioxidants. Our products include Red Wine Extract Powder, Zero Alcohol Wine Powder, Grape Seed Extract and Grape Skin Extract.

Australian Granny Smith Apples

Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients


The Botanical Innovations Group has created a unique range of Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients using Australian Granny Smith Apples.


Australian Granny Smith Apples



Granny Smith Apples were created in Australia by Mrs Maria Ann Smith in Epping NSW who arrived in Australia in 1830 with her husband. By chance Maria bought some French Crab apples at the markets from Tasmania which she assumed were rotten and tipped in the creek that ran through the family property. From the seed that germinated a new fruit tree grew which was different and not a French Crab Apple.

In 1868 Mrs Smith called a local orchardist and horticulturalist Mr EH Small to determine if this was a new variety of apple. Apples during this period were either categorised as being good for eating raw or those to be used for cooking. Mrs Smith’s new variety was classed as the best cooking apple in Australia the Granny Smith apple.

In 1907 HCL Anderson the Under Secretary of Agriculture, planted further Granny Smith apples on his property at Kingswood. Word of the apple’s quality soon caught the attention of Mr EK Wolstenholme, the Manager of the Bathurst Orchard Experiment Farm. Here Wolstenholme planted two Granny Smith’s along with two other apples of every know apple of the day. His idea was to discover which apples would be suited to growing at altitude in the Central West. He learnt too that the Granny Smith had a wonderful flavour, was an excellent keeping apple and for storage and was
also highly suited to growing in mountain climates. So impressed was he with the Granny Smith in 1912 he bought land and planted his own trees.

Orchardist Mr George Hazelwood of Kelso Bathurst discovered his best Grannies grew in a granite soil where there was a dry summer. He discovered that trees grown in a richer volcanic soil where there was plenty of rainfall had a different flavour. George also discovered that fruit grown in a pink granite soil were of a superior quality to those grown in white granite. During 1918 Hazelwood sold apples to the American Army.

By the 1960s the Granny Smith apple had achieved worldwide acclaim for its beautiful green hue, flavour and keeping quality. In England it had become the second mot popular selling apple.

Granny Smith apples continue to be grown throughout the Bathurst, Orange, Mt Canobolas regions of Central West NSW. The dry summer, rich soils and cold winters are believed to contribute to the superior quality of the Botanical Innovations Apple Cider Vinegar Powder with ‘mother’, Apple Cider Vinegar, Apple Fibre Powder, Apple Peel Extract and Apple Sweetener.

Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum

Nutraceutical Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

Botanical Name: Silymarin marianum
Common Names: St Mary’s Thistle, Holy Thistle, Blessed Thistle
Species: Asteraceae
Traditional Habitat: South Europe, North Africa, Asia and South RussiaToday: Grown commercially Australia, Germany, Austria, Eastern Europe and Mongolia.

Milk Thistle
Silymarin marianum

Milk thistle has been used for over 2,000 years. According to legend, the variegation on the leaves was caused by the Virgin Mary’s milk as it rad down the leaves, leading to the name marianum. Silybum is from the Greek silybon, a term used by Dioscorides for thistle like plants. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides wrote 40–90 AD in his book about approximately 600 medicinal plants and herbs that milk thistle tea was used as a remedy for snakebites.  

In the Middle Ages, people used milk thistle to treat different liver problems. The Herbal or Generall  Historie of Plant by John Gerard 1597 wrote that milk thistle was the best  remedy that grows against all melancholy diseases.

Nicholas Culpepper, a British herbalist, was first to record the value of milk thistle in treating

diseases of the liver and spleen in the late eighteenth century.

Recent studies show that active substances in milk thistle, particularly the antioxidant flavonoid silymarin, may protect the liver from damage caused by toxins, alcohol, and viruses, while also promoting the growth of new liver cells.

Silybum marianum is cultivated for food, medicines, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical applications.

The young leaves with spines removed are eaten raw or cooked as spinach like vegetable. Flower buds can be eaten like mini artichokes. The roots of first year plants are similar to salsify.

Botanical Innovations Milk Thistle Products for medicinal, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and health and wellness applications include: Milk Thistle Oil and Milk Thistle Silymarin Extract.

Australian Granny Smith Apples

Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients


The Botanical Innovations Group has created a unique range of Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients using Australian Granny Smith Apples.


Australian Granny Smith Apples



Granny Smith Apples were created in Australia by Mrs Maria Ann Smith in Epping NSW who arrived in Australia in 1830 with her husband. By chance Maria bought some French Crab apples at the markets from Tasmania which she assumed were rotten and tipped in the creek that ran through the family property. From the seed that germinated a new fruit tree grew which was different and not a French Crab Apple.

In 1868 Mrs Smith called a local orchardist and horticulturalist Mr EH Small to determine if this was a new variety of apple. Apples during this period were either categorised as being good for eating raw or those to be used for cooking. Mrs Smith’s new variety was classed as the best cooking apple in Australia the Granny Smith apple.

In 1907 HCL Anderson the Under Secretary of Agriculture, planted further Granny Smith apples on his property at Kingswood. Word of the apple’s quality soon caught the attention of Mr EK Wolstenholme, the Manager of the Bathurst Orchard Experiment Farm. Here Wolstenholme planted two Granny Smith’s along with two other apples of every know apple of the day. His idea was to discover which apples would be suited to growing at altitude in the Central West. He learnt too that the Granny Smith had a wonderful flavour, was an excellent keeping apple and for storage and was
also highly suited to growing in mountain climates. So impressed was he with the Granny Smith in 1912 he bought land and planted his own trees.

Orchardist Mr George Hazelwood of Kelso Bathurst discovered his best Grannies grew in a granite soil where there was a dry summer. He discovered that trees grown in a richer volcanic soil where there was plenty of rainfall had a different flavour. George also discovered that fruit grown in a pink granite soil were of a superior quality to those grown in white granite. During 1918 Hazelwood sold apples to the American Army.

By the 1960s the Granny Smith apple had achieved worldwide acclaim for its beautiful green hue, flavour and keeping quality. In England it had become the second mot popular selling apple.

Granny Smith apples continue to be grown throughout the Bathurst, Orange, Mt Canobolas regions of Central West NSW. The dry summer, rich soils and cold winters are believed to contribute to the superior quality of the Botanical Innovations Apple Cider Vinegar Powder with ‘mother’, Apple Cider Vinegar, Apple Fibre Powder, Apple Peel Extract and Apple Sweetener.

Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum

Nutraceutical Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

Botanical Name: Silymarin marianum
Common Names: St Mary’s Thistle, Holy Thistle, Blessed Thistle
Species: Asteraceae
Traditional Habitat: South Europe, North Africa, Asia and South RussiaToday: Grown commercially Australia, Germany, Austria, Eastern Europe and Mongolia.

Milk Thistle
Silymarin marianum

Milk thistle has been used for over 2,000 years. According to legend, the variegation on the leaves was caused by the Virgin Mary’s milk as it rad down the leaves, leading to the name marianum. Silybum is from the Greek silybon, a term used by Dioscorides for thistle like plants. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides wrote 40–90 AD in his book about approximately 600 medicinal plants and herbs that milk thistle tea was used as a remedy for snakebites.  

In the Middle Ages, people used milk thistle to treat different liver problems. The Herbal or Generall  Historie of Plant by John Gerard 1597 wrote that milk thistle was the best  remedy that grows against all melancholy diseases.

Nicholas Culpepper, a British herbalist, was first to record the value of milk thistle in treating

diseases of the liver and spleen in the late eighteenth century.

Recent studies show that active substances in milk thistle, particularly the antioxidant flavonoid silymarin, may protect the liver from damage caused by toxins, alcohol, and viruses, while also promoting the growth of new liver cells.

Silybum marianum is cultivated for food, medicines, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical applications.

The young leaves with spines removed are eaten raw or cooked as spinach like vegetable. Flower buds can be eaten like mini artichokes. The roots of first year plants are similar to salsify.

Botanical Innovations Milk Thistle Products for medicinal, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and health and wellness applications include: Milk Thistle Oil and Milk Thistle Silymarin Extract.

Australian Granny Smith Apples

Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients


The Botanical Innovations Group has created a unique range of Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients using Australian Granny Smith Apples.


Australian Granny Smith Apples



Granny Smith Apples were created in Australia by Mrs Maria Ann Smith in Epping NSW who arrived in Australia in 1830 with her husband. By chance Maria bought some French Crab apples at the markets from Tasmania which she assumed were rotten and tipped in the creek that ran through the family property. From the seed that germinated a new fruit tree grew which was different and not a French Crab Apple.

In 1868 Mrs Smith called a local orchardist and horticulturalist Mr EH Small to determine if this was a new variety of apple. Apples during this period were either categorised as being good for eating raw or those to be used for cooking. Mrs Smith’s new variety was classed as the best cooking apple in Australia the Granny Smith apple.

In 1907 HCL Anderson the Under Secretary of Agriculture, planted further Granny Smith apples on his property at Kingswood. Word of the apple’s quality soon caught the attention of Mr EK Wolstenholme, the Manager of the Bathurst Orchard Experiment Farm. Here Wolstenholme planted two Granny Smith’s along with two other apples of every know apple of the day. His idea was to discover which apples would be suited to growing at altitude in the Central West. He learnt too that the Granny Smith had a wonderful flavour, was an excellent keeping apple and for storage and was
also highly suited to growing in mountain climates. So impressed was he with the Granny Smith in 1912 he bought land and planted his own trees.

Orchardist Mr George Hazelwood of Kelso Bathurst discovered his best Grannies grew in a granite soil where there was a dry summer. He discovered that trees grown in a richer volcanic soil where there was plenty of rainfall had a different flavour. George also discovered that fruit grown in a pink granite soil were of a superior quality to those grown in white granite. During 1918 Hazelwood sold apples to the American Army.

By the 1960s the Granny Smith apple had achieved worldwide acclaim for its beautiful green hue, flavour and keeping quality. In England it had become the second mot popular selling apple.

Granny Smith apples continue to be grown throughout the Bathurst, Orange, Mt Canobolas regions of Central West NSW. The dry summer, rich soils and cold winters are believed to contribute to the superior quality of the Botanical Innovations Apple Cider Vinegar Powder with ‘mother’, Apple Cider Vinegar, Apple Fibre Powder, Apple Peel Extract and Apple Sweetener.

Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum

Nutraceutical Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

Botanical Name: Silymarin marianum
Common Names: St Mary’s Thistle, Holy Thistle, Blessed Thistle
Species: Asteraceae
Traditional Habitat: South Europe, North Africa, Asia and South RussiaToday: Grown commercially Australia, Germany, Austria, Eastern Europe and Mongolia.

Milk Thistle
Silymarin marianum

Milk thistle has been used for over 2,000 years. According to legend, the variegation on the leaves was caused by the Virgin Mary’s milk as it rad down the leaves, leading to the name marianum. Silybum is from the Greek silybon, a term used by Dioscorides for thistle like plants. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides wrote 40–90 AD in his book about approximately 600 medicinal plants and herbs that milk thistle tea was used as a remedy for snakebites.  

In the Middle Ages, people used milk thistle to treat different liver problems. The Herbal or Generall  Historie of Plant by John Gerard 1597 wrote that milk thistle was the best  remedy that grows against all melancholy diseases.

Nicholas Culpepper, a British herbalist, was first to record the value of milk thistle in treating

diseases of the liver and spleen in the late eighteenth century.

Recent studies show that active substances in milk thistle, particularly the antioxidant flavonoid silymarin, may protect the liver from damage caused by toxins, alcohol, and viruses, while also promoting the growth of new liver cells.

Silybum marianum is cultivated for food, medicines, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical applications.

The young leaves with spines removed are eaten raw or cooked as spinach like vegetable. Flower buds can be eaten like mini artichokes. The roots of first year plants are similar to salsify.

Botanical Innovations Milk Thistle Products for medicinal, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and health and wellness applications include: Milk Thistle Oil and Milk Thistle Silymarin Extract.

Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum

Nutraceutical Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

Botanical Name: Silymarin marianum
Common Names: St Mary’s Thistle, Holy Thistle, Blessed Thistle
Species: Asteraceae
Traditional Habitat: South Europe, North Africa, Asia and South RussiaToday: Grown commercially Australia, Germany, Austria, Eastern Europe and Mongolia.

Milk Thistle
Silymarin marianum

Milk thistle has been used for over 2,000 years. According to legend, the variegation on the leaves was caused by the Virgin Mary’s milk as it rad down the leaves, leading to the name marianum. Silybum is from the Greek silybon, a term used by Dioscorides for thistle like plants. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides wrote 40–90 AD in his book about approximately 600 medicinal plants and herbs that milk thistle tea was used as a remedy for snakebites.  

In the Middle Ages, people used milk thistle to treat different liver problems. The Herbal or Generall  Historie of Plant by John Gerard 1597 wrote that milk thistle was the best  remedy that grows against all melancholy diseases.

Nicholas Culpepper, a British herbalist, was first to record the value of milk thistle in treating

diseases of the liver and spleen in the late eighteenth century.

Recent studies show that active substances in milk thistle, particularly the antioxidant flavonoid silymarin, may protect the liver from damage caused by toxins, alcohol, and viruses, while also promoting the growth of new liver cells.

Silybum marianum is cultivated for food, medicines, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical applications.

The young leaves with spines removed are eaten raw or cooked as spinach like vegetable. Flower buds can be eaten like mini artichokes. The roots of first year plants are similar to salsify.

Botanical Innovations Milk Thistle Products for medicinal, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and health and wellness applications include: Milk Thistle Oil and Milk Thistle Silymarin Extract.

Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum

Nutraceutical Milk Thistle Silymarin marianum Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients

Botanical Name: Silymarin marianum
Common Names: St Mary’s Thistle, Holy Thistle, Blessed Thistle
Species: Asteraceae
Traditional Habitat: South Europe, North Africa, Asia and South RussiaToday: Grown commercially Australia, Germany, Austria, Eastern Europe and Mongolia.

Milk Thistle
Silymarin marianum

Milk thistle has been used for over 2,000 years. According to legend, the variegation on the leaves was caused by the Virgin Mary’s milk as it rad down the leaves, leading to the name marianum. Silybum is from the Greek silybon, a term used by Dioscorides for thistle like plants. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides wrote 40–90 AD in his book about approximately 600 medicinal plants and herbs that milk thistle tea was used as a remedy for snakebites.  

In the Middle Ages, people used milk thistle to treat different liver problems. The Herbal or Generall  Historie of Plant by John Gerard 1597 wrote that milk thistle was the best  remedy that grows against all melancholy diseases.

Nicholas Culpepper, a British herbalist, was first to record the value of milk thistle in treating

diseases of the liver and spleen in the late eighteenth century.

Recent studies show that active substances in milk thistle, particularly the antioxidant flavonoid silymarin, may protect the liver from damage caused by toxins, alcohol, and viruses, while also promoting the growth of new liver cells.

Silybum marianum is cultivated for food, medicines, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical applications.

The young leaves with spines removed are eaten raw or cooked as spinach like vegetable. Flower buds can be eaten like mini artichokes. The roots of first year plants are similar to salsify.

Botanical Innovations Milk Thistle Products for medicinal, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and health and wellness applications include: Milk Thistle Oil and Milk Thistle Silymarin Extract.

Australian Granny Smith Apples

Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients


The Botanical Innovations Group has created a unique range of Nutraceutical Flavours, Fragrances and Ingredients using Australian Granny Smith Apples.


Australian Granny Smith Apples



Granny Smith Apples were created in Australia by Mrs Maria Ann Smith in Epping NSW who arrived in Australia in 1830 with her husband. By chance Maria bought some French Crab apples at the markets from Tasmania which she assumed were rotten and tipped in the creek that ran through the family property. From the seed that germinated a new fruit tree grew which was different and not a French Crab Apple.

In 1868 Mrs Smith called a local orchardist and horticulturalist Mr EH Small to determine if this was a new variety of apple. Apples during this period were either categorised as being good for eating raw or those to be used for cooking. Mrs Smith’s new variety was classed as the best cooking apple in Australia the Granny Smith apple.

In 1907 HCL Anderson the Under Secretary of Agriculture, planted further Granny Smith apples on his property at Kingswood. Word of the apple’s quality soon caught the attention of Mr EK Wolstenholme, the Manager of the Bathurst Orchard Experiment Farm. Here Wolstenholme planted two Granny Smith’s along with two other apples of every know apple of the day. His idea was to discover which apples would be suited to growing at altitude in the Central West. He learnt too that the Granny Smith had a wonderful flavour, was an excellent keeping apple and for storage and was
also highly suited to growing in mountain climates. So impressed was he with the Granny Smith in 1912 he bought land and planted his own trees.

Orchardist Mr George Hazelwood of Kelso Bathurst discovered his best Grannies grew in a granite soil where there was a dry summer. He discovered that trees grown in a richer volcanic soil where there was plenty of rainfall had a different flavour. George also discovered that fruit grown in a pink granite soil were of a superior quality to those grown in white granite. During 1918 Hazelwood sold apples to the American Army.

By the 1960s the Granny Smith apple had achieved worldwide acclaim for its beautiful green hue, flavour and keeping quality. In England it had become the second mot popular selling apple.

Granny Smith apples continue to be grown throughout the Bathurst, Orange, Mt Canobolas regions of Central West NSW. The dry summer, rich soils and cold winters are believed to contribute to the superior quality of the Botanical Innovations Apple Cider Vinegar Powder with ‘mother’, Apple Cider Vinegar, Apple Fibre Powder, Apple Peel Extract and Apple Sweetener.